The Visual Language of a Resistance | The Noun Project

“Beyond the riots or protests of a resistance movement, what does this language of resistance look and sound like?”

How to visualize dissent? At the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, down the hall from fine China and ornate 17th Century textiles, the doors were opened for an exhibit devoted to this very question—and its still-evolving answer. The recently-wrapped exhibit, called Disobedient Objects, explored the dynamic relationship between protest and design.

During the Civil Rights Movement, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. famously expressed that “a riot is the language of the unheard.” In an environment where reasonable grievances are not addressed, nor given recourse to find resolution, protests are a natural extension of our need, as humans, to be heard. After all, we are highly expressive beings.

As humans who are also designers, we’re feeling newly fascinated–thanks to our current political climate–by the actual language of protests, and wanted to dive deeper into the visual history of resistance. Beyond the riots or protests of a resistance movement, what does this language of resistance look and sound like?

 

[excerpted from full article]

Chelsea White